ASTRONOMY & NATURAL HISTORY CONNECTIONS:

FROM DARWIN TO EINSTEIN
by Barry Boyce
$14.84
eBook

Publisher: THE BARYON PRESS

Publication Date: July 16, 2018

ISBN: 1230002431536

Binding: Kobo eBook

Availability: eBook

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NEW BOOK TIES ASTRONOMY TO NATURAL HISTORY – TEACHES BOTH The Baryon Press announces the release of a new science title that is a combined, in-depth astronomy/ natural history course. Astronomy & Natural History Connections: From Darwin to Einstein, written by Barry Boyce, is essential reading for the ever-curious in both sciences; the information ranges from entertaining yet thorough discussions on relativity and quantum mechanics as well as dynamic presentations of natural selection and speciation.

From the Classic Greek Periods to the present, many key biographies are included to maintain a historical perspective and to see the origins of the many connections between the physical and biological worlds. Examples of this unification include the importance of the Venus Transit in the history of scientific measurement and the role of Sir Isaac Newton in developing the concept of a testable Scientific Theory. In a section called Natural Connections (all the Chapters have a "Connections" theme), evolution is shown not to be necessarily adaptive, while natural selection is indeed the adaptive process and the guiding principle that Darwin used (and biology still does). "Speciation" is a bit complex as no traditional definition describes what a species is with a high degree of statistical accuracy. The term "species" itself is called into question as there is most probably a continuum of phenotypes/ genotypes rather than the discrete stops that taxonomy requires. Finally, migration is also viewed as complex and basically as an effective breeding strategy, but not the only one.

In the world of astronomy and astrophysics, the physical-chemical mechanism of nucleosynthesis is thoroughly presented in a fashion that the layperson can follow; an interesting theme here is hydrodynamic equilibrium, the balancing of gravity and pressure, allowing for stars to produce light for up to billions of years.