52 (Count 'Em) 52

by Robert Magill
$1.25
eBook

Publisher: Robert Magill

Publication Date: May 10, 2015

ISBN: 9781301832620

Binding: Kobo eBook

Availability: eBook

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Provocative collection of status quo challenges to just about everything we take for granted including our history, mores, polity and assumptions about the future. Unflattering remarks claiming the English language is wimpy. New discoveries in anthropology suggest your
ggg grandfather was a Neanderthal. What to do with your money that may be the worst idea ever; then again, maybe not. Noam Chomsky explains why we are the most fundamentalist society on the planet. Worse than the Taliban! A Maui cult as future-shock.
We examine the current fuss about Darwin vs. Creationists and vote on which Genesis story
will prevail in little Johnny's classroom. A lot of different takes on the birthday of the Cosmos included here. The US Marines long ago visited the Shores of Tripoli pursuing Moslem pirates and every Century since we've had a go at them. It's getting to be a habit. The twentieth century is the scene of the infamous Corpse Derby. Learn who is tied for first place and who came in last in the carnage score.
Nature was willing from the get-go to sacrifice one of her greatest little gems, the gorgeous blue planet Earth. She risked the probability it would eventually be ruined in order to allow the evolution of a conscious species. The sacrifice of time, countless other living orders and other less aware competitors was wantonly permitted. The chosen aware species was even permitted to wreak havoc; to plunder and pillage the treasures abounding on her precious sphere. She wasted no effort in toilet training the lot of us. Was it all worthwhile?
In America today our rights are not being plundered as much as they are dribbled away or signed away, almost daily. Every Presidential dictum and Court decision seemingly adulterates or reverses values which were hard earned and once considered sacred by dint of having been fought and bled for in the past. The ceaseless erosion of our "unique in all the world" tenet is scarcely noticed ...